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Oh no! We are NOT chasing cars!

 

“Yeah, Mickey, you might be a border collie and need to chase things, but it WON’T be cars!”, said me inside my head to no one. 😉 

This 15 week old puppy was afraid of cars and then decided he had the power to chase them away AT THE FENCE-LINE! Yikes..

What if this becomes a habit and he barks along with it?  What if he starts chasing them on leash? What if he ever gets off-leash near a road or starts chasing a car?

So… time for a plan. 

I have a few ways to work on this but I’m going to start with the 3 most important steps to stop Mickey from chasing cars and these have gone into effect as of… yesterday! 

They are all in this video: Click here to watch it.

Thanks for watching and reading and now I’d love to hear from you.

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Training your dog is not “All or Nothing!”

Training your dog is not “All or Nothing”!

Please don’t expect perfection.

Right now, a guy is using big metal noisy ladders to climb the side of our house and clean the gutters. The blower is loud. Very loud and very close to the windows. This started with a doorbell and intermittently, my husband has gone out to talk to him. Rae has barked on and off. “The guy is too close!”, she’d say, “Look at him! He’s got that big blower thing! I hate that noise!”

I would reassure her but not by telling her “It’s okay, it’s okay, it’s okay.” in some coddling, frantic way. Instead, I would just take a look with her, tell her it’s okay, distract her a bit or take her with me. Sometimes, I had her in a down or asked her to lay on her side, a calming position.

Did it take a little extra time? Yes. More than normal because she has a cast on and can’t exercise so she tends to overreact a little. But I don’t. I just stay calm. I listen to her. I look outside with her. I use what she knows to calm her down.

Sometimes our expectations can be too high. We want a dog to alarm us but only when it’s convenient for us! It doesn’t’ work that way. There is give and take.

If you want your dog to stop and think before reacting, you need to do the same.

Your dog is a living, breathing and thinking being that deserves respect.

Thanks for watching and reading and now I’d love to hear from you.

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Don’t make this BIG mistake when leash walking with your dog!

The Loose Leash Walking course is OPEN for registration! Click here to learn more

Distractions are not only a BIG mistake but common ones too and it’s not only a problem with children, spouses and your work, it can be a problem with your dog too.

Watch the video to learn more about how to connect with your dog and make leash walking an EXPERIENCE!

I doubt your friend would want to keep walking with you, go to a restaurant or do any activity together if you were always on your phone. It’s rude and frustrating.

Being on your phone when you are walking your dog is the same as being on your phone when you are walking with a friend. 

So when your dog is pulling, barking or lunging on the leash, part of the problem might be your connection. If you are on your phone or simply daydreaming, you are not really walking together and isn’t that the idea? Maybe once your dog is older and has more practice on the leash, you can multitask, but if you have problems and are training, it is critical that you keep your focus on your dog.

Do you need more help teaching your dog to walk on a loose leash?

Join my Loose Leash Walking class which is scheduled to open again in January or February 2021. You can get on the Waiting List and be the first to hear when registration opens! 

Click here to learn more

 

Thanks for watching and reading and now I’d love to hear from you.

Please scroll down and leave a comment.

Might seem crazy… a simple start to leash walking

The Loose Leash Walking course is OPEN for registration! Click here to learn more

If your dog is pulling, barking or lunging on the leash, where exactly do you begin?

On the leash… without walking! Yup, that’s the first “baby step”.

Just go outside on the leash and stay right by the door or by the garage. Let your dog look around, take in the sights, smells and sounds and give yourself an easy retreat back to home base.

Why? Because the best thing you can do with a dog that pulls, barks or lunges on leash is to prevent that behavior. Every time your dog behaves poorly on a leash, that behavior is REINFORCED. Reinforced means the behavior is becoming an automatic response or is already an automatic response (habit) and just becomes more ingrained.

It’s awfully hard to teach new behavior when you are reinforcing the behavior you don’t want. Right!?

Stop reading and think about that for a minute…”Reinforced”. You really do not want to reinforce problems on a leash that can be a serious safety issue.

Ok… you say… but your dog needs exercise!!! I get it…

My dog, Rae, just had elbow surgery and has a big cast on her leg. She is ONLY allowed to walk to eliminate. That’s it! For at least 8 weeks!

Rae is a high drive, energetic, young Australian Shepherd who defines life as movement, but there is no alternative just like is sometimes the case with a behavior issue. So try to think of your issue as a physical issue to make it easier on yourself. There are times that your dog just can’t do what they want so we have to find them alternatives.

This is your best alternative to get started: Take your dog out for 20-30 min but stay right next to your door and let your dog look around, enjoy the sights, sounds and smells. Your dog will get some enrichment and you can relax knowing you have a quick escape – and actually, relaxing is “half the battle”.

Then get going on teaching your dog to walk nicely on a loose leash.

Do you need help teaching your dog to walk on a loose leash?

Join my Loose Leash Walking class which is scheduled to open again in January or February 2021. You can get on the Waiting List and be the first to hear when registration opens! 

Click here to learn more

Thanks for watching and reading and now I’d love to hear from you.

Please scroll down and leave a comment.

Fireworks and Thunderstorms: An Often Overlooked, Simple Way To Help Your Dog

I hear you about fireworks! Those with dogs that are sensitive to storms have it hard enough without adding fireworks and you just wish people would STOP! They scare your dog, many other animals and even people, particularly those with PTSD. 

Sometimes people laugh at your stories about your dog, but you know…

…it’s no laughing matter to have a dog trembling in fear in the corner, chewing things up, peeing in the house or barking non-stop. 

Your dog is probably having what is equivalent to a panic attack in a person or they are deeply disturbed by the noise. They can’t think, have no self-control, don’t understand and can often react in destructive ways.

Fireworks in the US start well before July 4th and usually persist afterwards too. 

And the storms just keep on coming.

So what can you do? Watch the video above

There are things like anxiety wraps, pheromones, supplements and medications – some for short-term use and some for long-term use but…

…often overlooked is the effect your own reaction has on your dog, especially early on and that’s easy to change.

You mean well and may think you are helping, when in fact you may be making your dog’s experience worse. 

Watch this video and no matter what treatment your dog needs, this subtle change in you, can help:

Thanks for watching and reading and now I’d love to hear from you.

Please scroll down and leave a comment.

What your dog needs (and doesn’t need) to be successful

In life with your dogs, there are things they need and things they don’t.

The number one thing dogs need? CLARITY! If your training in struggling or you aren’t getting the behavior you want from them, chances are you aren’t clear enough or you’re creating conflict.

What doesn’t help? Using a stern voice. Good training (and clarity!) will help your dog improve. You can get the same results (if not BETTER) by using a neutral or happy voice with your dog when giving them a command.

Watch this video to find out how clarity and vocal tone can affect your training.

Did this video help clarify something for you? Leave a comment below and let me know!